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huaarrggghhh

Hello there... you mystically found my blog. well, be prepared because its boring as fuck. Run while you still can. ahaha

I seriously have an addiction to collecting colour swatches, curse words, art, delicious delicious arrrtttt, online comicssss, what the fuck ever... all kinds of shit

.____________________.

I tag all of my art "zee does art" in case if you are curious

Here's my Doodle or Die for more bullshittery/art
Oct 2 '14
cupidmike:

mjwatson:

A Response to ‘Women Against Feminism.’
Imagine this:
The year is 2014. You are a white Western woman. You wake up in the morning in a comfortably sized house or flat. You have a full or part-time job that enables you to pay your rent or mortgage. You have been to school and maybe even college or university as well. You can read and write and count. You own a car or have a driver’s licence. You have enough money in your own bank account to feed and clothe yourself. You have access to the Internet. You can vote. You have a boyfriend or girlfriend of your choosing, who you can also marry if you want to, and raise a family with. You walk down the street wearing whatever you feel like wearing. You can go to bars and clubs and sleep with whomever you want.
Your world is full of freedom and possibility.
Then you pick up a newspaper or go online. You read about angry women ranting about sexism and inequality. You see phrases like ‘rape-culture’ and ‘slut-shaming.’ You furrow your brow and think to yourself: ‘What are they so angry about? There is no such thing as sexism anymore.’
Now imagine this: 
The year is 2013. You are a 25 year-old Pakistani woman. A few months ago, you married the man you love. A man you choose for yourself. You are also pregnant with his child. You see your life stretching out before you, filled with hope and happiness. Suddenly, you and your husband are dragged away from each other. You are both beaten with bricks and batons. You can’t fight back. You can’t escape. No one comes to help you. Through your fading vision, you look up, and look into the eyes of one of your assailants: into the eyes of your father.
The year is 2013. You are a 23 year-old Indian woman. You are a physiotherapy student with a promising career ahead of you. You are sitting on a private bus travelling home alone on a warm December evening. You gaze out of the window as the buildings of New Dheli rush past you and feel content. Suddenly, a blunt force hits the back of your head and you fall to the floor of the bus. A group of strange men are standing over you. They bring the metal bar down on you again and again and again until all you can taste is the blood filling up your mouth. You pray that you will die soon. And you do, but not then. You are raped, beaten, and tortured over and over again. Death is slow and agonising.
The year is 2014. You are a 13 year-old girl from Niger. You no longer live there though. You are now living in the neighbouring country Nigeria, sitting alone in small room on a small bed in a small apartment high above the city of Kano. You are not allowed to leave. Your stomach is swollen from the unwanted life growing inside of it. You had no choice. The father is a man in his 40s. He is a businessman. He has bought you as his wife. You were a penniless, uneducated girl when he came for you. You don’t know of any life you could have had. Neither did your family: just one less mouth for them to feed. You still have the body of a child, and it’s straining under the pressure from the one inside of you. You feel like you’re about to be split in two. You don’t wonder if you will survive the birth. A part of you doesn’t want to.
These are fictionalised accounts of real events that have happened to real women living in our world today. They follow the past 250 years of women and men campaigning for women to be given equal rights to men to prevent these kinds of injustices and abuses on the grounds of gender taking place. Over the course of this time, campaigners – Feminists, both female and male – have been locked up, beaten, tortured, and even killed, in the pursuit of equality. They did this with pen and ink and print; they did this with their voices; they did this with their bodies; they did this with art and music; they did in courts of law and halls and houses of government that they fought be to allowed into.
They did this so that women would no longer been seen as property, livestock, breeding machines, sex objects, punching bags, or infantile morons. They did this not just for themselves, but also for their daughters, and their daughters, and their daughters for generations to come. They did this for women they would never meet – women who lived across countries, across vast oceans, across the entire globe, and even across time.
They did this so that women like me – a white Western woman – could attend school and university; to learn to read, write, and think critically; to gain a degree; to get a job and be paid an equal salary to a man in the same position; and to sit here with my own computer and type all of this.
Feminism is a movement for freedom, equality, choice, love, compassion, respect, solidarity, and education. We may argue, we may disagree, we may struggle to understand the choices and perspectives of others sometimes, but these core beliefs of the movement have never changed, and they never will.
That is why I am a Feminist.
If you feel that you have so far lived your life unaffected by even the mildest form of sexism – anything from feeling uncomfortable when a man catcalls you in the street, to feeling scared walking home alone at night in a secluded area – and are treated with love and respect by every man in your life, then to you I say: I’m glad for you. If you don’t think you need feminism, then that is a victory for the movement. You have fulfilled all those dreams that every suffragette being force-fed in prison and every ‘witch’ burnt at the stake dreamed you would one day.
But perhaps take a second to consider the life of the Pakistani woman who was beaten to death by her own family for marrying a man of her choosing. Or the life of the Indian woman who was raped, beaten, and murdered on a bus by a gang of men. Or the life of the little girl in Niger who was sold to a man more than twice her own age and forced to carry a baby that may kill her to deliver. Do they still need feminism?
And perhaps take a second to consider this too: Even in our liberal, Western world, why do women still only fill 24% of senior management jobs? Why are more women than men domestically abused or even killed every week at the hands of their male partner or ex-partner? Why is there still a pay gap (in the UK specifically) of 15% for women doing the same jobs and working the same hours as men?
And what about on a cultural level? Have you ever noticed how comedy panel shows usually only have one female panellist compared to 4-5 male ones? That almost every dieting product on the market is solely aimed at women? How a lot of newspapers and advertising campaigns will use a sexualised or pornographic image of a woman to sell news or products that have nothing to do with sex?
Or perhaps on a personal level: Do you choose to wear certain clothes because you want to or because you feel ‘unfeminine’ if you don’t? Do you choose to cover yourself up because you want to or because you feel ashamed or intimidated by a man looking at your body? Do you shave your legs and underarm hair because you want to or because you will look ‘ugly’ if you don’t? Did your parents dress you in pink as a baby because they liked the colour or because you were born a girl? Do you want to have children because you want to or because you are a woman?
When you look at yourself in the mirror in the morning, do you see yourself through your own eyes, or through the eyes of the men that will look at you when you walk out the door?
The fact is, like it or not, you still live a world where gender matters. Where gender controls not just the entire course of your life – but the lives of women all over the world. Every second, a child will be born female in a country where she will persecuted for this random biological occurrence for the rest of her life. So before you hold up your anti-Feminist placard proudly and smile at your own sense of empowerment, think not what Feminism can do for you, but what it can do for that one girl. She needs someone to stand up for her. That someone could be you.
[ x ]

Read this. Read all of this. Then read it again.

cupidmike:

mjwatson:

A Response to ‘Women Against Feminism.’

Imagine this:

The year is 2014. You are a white Western woman. You wake up in the morning in a comfortably sized house or flat. You have a full or part-time job that enables you to pay your rent or mortgage. You have been to school and maybe even college or university as well. You can read and write and count. You own a car or have a driver’s licence. You have enough money in your own bank account to feed and clothe yourself. You have access to the Internet. You can vote. You have a boyfriend or girlfriend of your choosing, who you can also marry if you want to, and raise a family with. You walk down the street wearing whatever you feel like wearing. You can go to bars and clubs and sleep with whomever you want.

Your world is full of freedom and possibility.

Then you pick up a newspaper or go online. You read about angry women ranting about sexism and inequality. You see phrases like ‘rape-culture’ and ‘slut-shaming.’ You furrow your brow and think to yourself: ‘What are they so angry about? There is no such thing as sexism anymore.’

Now imagine this:

The year is 2013. You are a 25 year-old Pakistani woman. A few months ago, you married the man you love. A man you choose for yourself. You are also pregnant with his child. You see your life stretching out before you, filled with hope and happiness. Suddenly, you and your husband are dragged away from each other. You are both beaten with bricks and batons. You can’t fight back. You can’t escape. No one comes to help you. Through your fading vision, you look up, and look into the eyes of one of your assailants: into the eyes of your father.

The year is 2013. You are a 23 year-old Indian woman. You are a physiotherapy student with a promising career ahead of you. You are sitting on a private bus travelling home alone on a warm December evening. You gaze out of the window as the buildings of New Dheli rush past you and feel content. Suddenly, a blunt force hits the back of your head and you fall to the floor of the bus. A group of strange men are standing over you. They bring the metal bar down on you again and again and again until all you can taste is the blood filling up your mouth. You pray that you will die soon. And you do, but not then. You are raped, beaten, and tortured over and over again. Death is slow and agonising.

The year is 2014. You are a 13 year-old girl from Niger. You no longer live there though. You are now living in the neighbouring country Nigeria, sitting alone in small room on a small bed in a small apartment high above the city of Kano. You are not allowed to leave. Your stomach is swollen from the unwanted life growing inside of it. You had no choice. The father is a man in his 40s. He is a businessman. He has bought you as his wife. You were a penniless, uneducated girl when he came for you. You don’t know of any life you could have had. Neither did your family: just one less mouth for them to feed. You still have the body of a child, and it’s straining under the pressure from the one inside of you. You feel like you’re about to be split in two. You don’t wonder if you will survive the birth. A part of you doesn’t want to.

These are fictionalised accounts of real events that have happened to real women living in our world today. They follow the past 250 years of women and men campaigning for women to be given equal rights to men to prevent these kinds of injustices and abuses on the grounds of gender taking place. Over the course of this time, campaigners – Feminists, both female and male – have been locked up, beaten, tortured, and even killed, in the pursuit of equality. They did this with pen and ink and print; they did this with their voices; they did this with their bodies; they did this with art and music; they did in courts of law and halls and houses of government that they fought be to allowed into.

They did this so that women would no longer been seen as property, livestock, breeding machines, sex objects, punching bags, or infantile morons. They did this not just for themselves, but also for their daughters, and their daughters, and their daughters for generations to come. They did this for women they would never meet – women who lived across countries, across vast oceans, across the entire globe, and even across time.

They did this so that women like me – a white Western woman – could attend school and university; to learn to read, write, and think critically; to gain a degree; to get a job and be paid an equal salary to a man in the same position; and to sit here with my own computer and type all of this.

Feminism is a movement for freedom, equality, choice, love, compassion, respect, solidarity, and education. We may argue, we may disagree, we may struggle to understand the choices and perspectives of others sometimes, but these core beliefs of the movement have never changed, and they never will.

That is why I am a Feminist.

If you feel that you have so far lived your life unaffected by even the mildest form of sexism – anything from feeling uncomfortable when a man catcalls you in the street, to feeling scared walking home alone at night in a secluded area – and are treated with love and respect by every man in your life, then to you I say: I’m glad for you. If you don’t think you need feminism, then that is a victory for the movement. You have fulfilled all those dreams that every suffragette being force-fed in prison and every ‘witch’ burnt at the stake dreamed you would one day.

But perhaps take a second to consider the life of the Pakistani woman who was beaten to death by her own family for marrying a man of her choosing. Or the life of the Indian woman who was raped, beaten, and murdered on a bus by a gang of men. Or the life of the little girl in Niger who was sold to a man more than twice her own age and forced to carry a baby that may kill her to deliver. Do they still need feminism?

And perhaps take a second to consider this too: Even in our liberal, Western world, why do women still only fill 24% of senior management jobs? Why are more women than men domestically abused or even killed every week at the hands of their male partner or ex-partner? Why is there still a pay gap (in the UK specifically) of 15% for women doing the same jobs and working the same hours as men?

And what about on a cultural level? Have you ever noticed how comedy panel shows usually only have one female panellist compared to 4-5 male ones? That almost every dieting product on the market is solely aimed at women? How a lot of newspapers and advertising campaigns will use a sexualised or pornographic image of a woman to sell news or products that have nothing to do with sex?

Or perhaps on a personal level: Do you choose to wear certain clothes because you want to or because you feel ‘unfeminine’ if you don’t? Do you choose to cover yourself up because you want to or because you feel ashamed or intimidated by a man looking at your body? Do you shave your legs and underarm hair because you want to or because you will look ‘ugly’ if you don’t? Did your parents dress you in pink as a baby because they liked the colour or because you were born a girl? Do you want to have children because you want to or because you are a woman?

When you look at yourself in the mirror in the morning, do you see yourself through your own eyes, or through the eyes of the men that will look at you when you walk out the door?

The fact is, like it or not, you still live a world where gender matters. Where gender controls not just the entire course of your life – but the lives of women all over the world. Every second, a child will be born female in a country where she will persecuted for this random biological occurrence for the rest of her life. So before you hold up your anti-Feminist placard proudly and smile at your own sense of empowerment, think not what Feminism can do for you, but what it can do for that one girl. She needs someone to stand up for her. That someone could be you.

[ x ]

Read this. Read all of this. Then read it again.

Oct 2 '14
mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

BREAKING: Here’s the tweet that could lead to a new grand jury in Ferguson, MO. 
#Ferguson: @shaunking took screenshot of tweeter @thesusannichols who claims to know juror on #MikeBrown #DarrenWilson grand jury & appears to be receiving leaked information. King says that within seconds of posting this, her friends told her to delete it & she did but not before it was screenshotted. She has since deleted her entire account but King says they checked & she is indeed a #STL resident w/ years’ worth of tweets from there. “If true, her tweet not only reveals a leak in the grand jury, but gives us an ugly glimpse into how things have gone so far. This person who posted it on twitter & her contact on the grand jury must be fully & completely investigated & removed if it’s true.”-@shaunking

Y’all better reblog the fuck outta this post it on facebook, twitter, IG, myspace, friendster, everything get this information out

mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

BREAKING: Here’s the tweet that could lead to a new grand jury in Ferguson, MO. 

#Ferguson@shaunking took screenshot of tweeter @thesusannichols who claims to know juror on #MikeBrown #DarrenWilson grand jury & appears to be receiving leaked information. King says that within seconds of posting this, her friends told her to delete it & she did but not before it was screenshotted. She has since deleted her entire account but King says they checked & she is indeed a #STL resident w/ years’ worth of tweets from there. “If true, her tweet not only reveals a leak in the grand jury, but gives us an ugly glimpse into how things have gone so far. This person who posted it on twitter & her contact on the grand jury must be fully & completely investigated & removed if it’s true.”-@shaunking

Y’all better reblog the fuck outta this post it on facebook, twitter, IG, myspace, friendster, everything get this information out

Oct 1 '14

socialjusticekoolaid:

Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop (9.29.14): At around 1:30AM CST, the police have released the unjustly arrested protesters. This is still some of the most ridiculous shit I’ve ever seen, but at least folks are back out and headed home to their families. The struggle continues. No justice, no peace! #staywoke #farfromover (PT I) (PT II) (PT III)

Follow the developments live @ Argus LIVESTREAM.

Oct 1 '14

asylum-art:

Richard Shilling's Land Art

Art Blog

richard shilling makes art using only that which he finds in nature - broken twigs, fallen leaves, mud, tree sap, torn bark - and returns it in creations he ‘leaves’ for others to find.

Land artists take naturally occurring materials in the wild and rearrange them into works of art. That’s what Richard Shilling does, using no glue, string, or any other materials. You can see some prime examples of his ingenuity at the link. Shilling makes excellent use of translucent leaves, flexible stems, and stones to make effective sculptures. The wind often sweeps away his works within minutes of completion, but that’s okay with Shilling because it is an affirmation of the transient nature of life.

Thanks to nubbsgalore for this post and thanks for the talent of this Great Sculptor of Nature: richard shilling

Oct 1 '14
malformalady:

An ice cave lit by falsefire under the Mutnovskiy volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia.
Photo credit: Daniel Kordan

malformalady:

An ice cave lit by falsefire under the Mutnovskiy volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia.

Photo credit: Daniel Kordan

Oct 1 '14

archiemcphee:

Bangkok-based photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously featured here) continues to take breathtaking photos of Siamese fighting fish, also known as betta fish. His fascination with their splendid, flowing fins and brilliant coloring is apparent in the extraordinarily detailed portraits he creates. The photos are so perfectly clear and close-up that it’s easy to forget the fish are underwater and not floating in midair.

Angkatavanich recently told Popular Photography that he only started photographing the fish after encountering them for the first time three years ago at a fish show and has since become obsessed with the different species which vary greatly in size, shape, and color patterns.

Head over to Visarute Angkatavanich’s 500px gallery to view more of his gorgeous betta portraits. Limited edition prints of his photos are currently available through La Lanta Fine Art.

[via Colossal]

Sep 30 '14

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police gas protesters in Hong Kong. Part 1.

Part 2

Sep 30 '14
wasbella102:

Claude Monet in 1923
Colourized Photos

wasbella102:

Claude Monet in 1923

Colourized Photos

Sep 30 '14
siddharthasmama:

whoismims:

Hong Kong’s protesters are using the same “hands up, don’t shoot” gesture used in Ferguson

tears in my eyes; solidarity arising from such horrible situations is bittersweet.

siddharthasmama:

whoismims:

Hong Kong’s protesters are using the same “hands up, don’t shoot” gesture used in Ferguson

tears in my eyes; solidarity arising from such horrible situations is bittersweet.

Sep 30 '14

as-warm-as-choco:

The Samurai Champloo (サムライチャンプルー) cosplayers that stole my heart… Thank you SO much for bringing back so many memories. T_T The anachronisms, the animation, the music, the historical knowledge that it made me search for. I fell in love with Edo Period, japanese mythology and (ukiyo-e) painting. I fell in love with the director (Shinichiro Watanabe) and THEN with Cowboy Bebop. Masaru Gotsubo’s manga. Nakazawa’s designs. Shing02. SO much jazz knowledge from Nujabes’ samples. Thank you, Jun. どうもありがとうございます!Mystline still makes me cry. I fell so much in love it took me 9 months to write a tribute song over The Final View. It took a poem’s time, and hopefully it has the beauty of one… And the dopeness of yours. T_T Hope you and Dilla will listen to it next February 7. There hasn’t been a greek tribute (that sounded ancient) so it will be my honor. R.I.P. Samurai who smells of Sunflowers.

MUGEN (ムゲン,2)  Kyōno (恭乃)
JIN
 (ジン Sakadzuki (サカヅキ)
FUU KASUMI
 (フウ Akane (朱音)

PHOTO BY CHOKORO (ちょころ)

Sep 30 '14
kingcheddarxvii:

He waits, watching with envious eyes. You’ve only been working on this show for a few weeks, but you’ve seen him spend more time doing it than you’ve seen him ham it up in front of the camera. When you asked the line producer, she just told you to ignore it, that it’s just Guy’s thing, that it means nothing, do your job. But you’re beginning to think it’s more than a habit. There’s something dark down there, beneath those sunglasses. As you watch Guy stare into the food from afar you can’t help but feel that there’s something other than hunger in his heart. Is it lust? Is it… contempt? You suppose it doesn’t matter. Just a few more weeks and you’ll be out of this gig and on to another. But one day he makes eye contact with you as Greg gets shots of the customers. In that moment, he speaks to you. Not with words but with a dark, troubled aura. He presses a finger to his lips. You stay silent. He shifts his mournful gaze back to the food, and you follow suit. You stare at the food. It stares back.

kingcheddarxvii:

He waits, watching with envious eyes. You’ve only been working on this show for a few weeks, but you’ve seen him spend more time doing it than you’ve seen him ham it up in front of the camera. When you asked the line producer, she just told you to ignore it, that it’s just Guy’s thing, that it means nothing, do your job. But you’re beginning to think it’s more than a habit. There’s something dark down there, beneath those sunglasses. As you watch Guy stare into the food from afar you can’t help but feel that there’s something other than hunger in his heart. Is it lust? Is it… contempt? You suppose it doesn’t matter. Just a few more weeks and you’ll be out of this gig and on to another. But one day he makes eye contact with you as Greg gets shots of the customers. In that moment, he speaks to you. Not with words but with a dark, troubled aura. He presses a finger to his lips. You stay silent. He shifts his mournful gaze back to the food, and you follow suit. You stare at the food. It stares back.

(Source: cultofhugs)

Sep 30 '14

(Source: hippiesispunkz)

Sep 30 '14

thepeoplesrecord:

socialjusticekoolaid:

Last Night in Ferguson (9.28-9.29): Last night’s protest was one of the in Ferguson this month, proving once again that the residents of Ferguson/STL County are some of the most resilient and inspiring in all the land. The police were literally holding peaceful protesters hostage late into the night (folks who were complying with all police requests) so they could negotiate with the remaining folks to leave, but the protesters didn’t back down. Eventually all arrestees were released, and many plan to be back out there tonight.

Injustice in Ferguson continues, but despite it, community now thrives too. This is still happening. Are you still paying attention? #staywoke #farfromover

You cannot jail the resistance!